Bio

Curriculum Vitae

I spent my undergraduate career at Tucson, Arizona attending The University of Arizona. I began studying Physics but soon switched to Psychology. Through my research experience I gained an appreciation for Computer Science and started taking some programming courses from which I was hooked on programming. Ever since then I've been finding ways to incorporate the two into my research which is how I have found my way to University of California-Santa Cruz researching Human-Computer Interaction.

I am interested in how individual and social behavior can be explained by large scale data analysis. My thesis is centered on the study of the behaviors, interactions, influences, and changes that individuals of certain social roles go through in an online community. This encompasses four main areas of research.

Projects

  • Distinguishing member and leader roles

One major distinction within communities is between leaders and members. My work is continuing on the already existing literature of online social roles through examining social roles within enterprise communities. Through a mixed method approach of analyzing content and behaviors of self defined roles, I have been able to develop models in order to distinguish such roles.

  • Ecology of Social Roles

Social roles typically are defined in relational terms, with this in mind it is needed to understand the social influence that roles have on each other. This work is expanding upon simple role differences by examining a community as an ecology through social network analysis and graphical modeling. Two approaches my work is taking is that of user-community interaction and smaller dyadic interactions between two users.

  • Success of Social Role Behaviors

Social roles typically are defined in relational terms, with this in mind it is needed to understand the social influence that roles have on each other. This work is expanding upon simple role differences by examining a community as an ecology through social network analysis and graphical modeling. Two approaches my work is taking is that of user-community interaction and smaller dyadic interactions between two users.

  • Role dynamics over time

There is has been much literature on the changes of roles and communities over time, however little quantitative evidence has been provided. My final goal of my thesis is to understand social role changes over time and how member-leader responsibilities are fluid through the life-cycle of a community.

  • Older Projects

Analytics of large scale online communities to predict online individual and social behavior. Various descriptive lifecycle models characterize community development, but there has been little quantitative exploration of how communities change over time, specifically how they organize and structure extensive long-term content. I'm exploring whether content is organized, who organizes it, and which social media tools they use. Technical implications include the need for more dedicated support for curation, in particular to better exploit linking tools and to encourage members to take more responsibility for organization. The ultimate goal is to identify successful individual and community practices and metrics to increase online community health..

Classifying argument style within political debate forums. This research is a shift from examining cooperative communities, to observing conflict that arises within online communities. Previous research on argument style has been focused on traditional rhetoric forms. However, from observations made within online debate forums it is seen that typically, people are arguing with an emotional appeal instead of structural. My research has developed a fair classifier to identify a binary distinction between fact or emotional based arguments. Further observations have found that arguments are not restricted to only the use of one style and future work is to include a continuous scale between the two styles.